Tuesday, April 9, 2013

When does it become to much?

I was doing my normal cruising around the internet on different horse show sites and noticed we could do a show every weekend for the rest of the year if we wanted to.  It got me thinking....when does it become to much?  How many shows are practical?  What's to much for your horse?  I know my daughter and she would show every weekend if my time and finances allowed, but what about poor Indie.  Being new to the show scene I'm not sure how often people show their horses.

This question came to mind.  How often do you show? 

3 comments:

  1. for us, it depends on the year, the horse, etc. Personally when I was an older youth rider, then as an adult we easily packed in 40+ shows a year. We went every weekend, sat & sun. With my daughters now (they are only 7 & 3) we do maybe 15-20. I also do not long haul with them as much as I will once they get older (if they are so inclined to campaign for national titles).

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  2. fellow horse show momApril 17, 2013 at 6:42 AM

    We decide before the season starts, which type of showing we want to do. Whether we want to try for year end awards at a Saddle club, or one particular show circuit, or if we are just out to get some experience with a new horse, and don't have year-end type goals. Each year it changes as the kids get older. We started with a Saddle club, and attended their shows as priority, then progressed to the circuit that club was a part of. We chose to do some bigger breed shows just for the experience, then the next year set our goals on the Breed Show experience, and didn't do all the club shows. My kids started as 4 and 6 year olds on the pony and old horse, and have progressed to Breed show competitive, 4H state champions, and PHBA World champions. But it all started with the local saddle club, and setting the goals for the year, and taking it one year at a time, in a way that the kids were excited and enthusiastic about.

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  3. I think that the previous reader hit the nail on the head. Start small and aim high. Always have a set of goals in mind. Short term, and long term. A realistic conversation has to be had with the trainer. Both horse and rider should be evaluated to determine what shows would be more beneficial. The key is remember that its supposed to be fun. If both horse and rider are stressed out..then it may not be for you.

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